Featured

Featured Jobs: Travel.

“Wherever you go becomes a part of you somehow.”Anita Desai

Are you interested in a dream career that involves travel?  If so, check out who is hiring 1,000 crew members for 2018.  Is this you or someone you know?  Share and see this latest post from Glassdoor.

boss-fight-free-high-quality-stock-images-photos-photography-woman-map-960x641

It’s never too late to see the world and get paid to do it!  The primary role of a crew member is safety.  Other skills and abilities that benefit you in this role include working with people of diverse backgrounds and cultures, customer service, ability to problem solve, hospitality, and if you are bilingual, it’s a plus.  Does this sound like you?  If so, apply.  Good Luck!

 

Advertisements

911: CAREER NEWS | ICYMI

eye-female-funny-glass-41558

A Quick Dose of Career News for the Week of 01/09/17…

10 Startup Founders Share What Their Worst Boss Taught Them…

Good News for Disabled Workers via Fortune.com…

4 Success Habits You Can Learn from Jeff Bezos, the World’s Fourth Richest Person…

11 Things Smart People Don’t Say…

 

 

 

 

The Talent Gap. Who is to Blame?

Is it a lack of qualified candidates or is it a lack of talented and skilled labor?  As of today, there is no shortage of talent in the jobs marketplace.  However, there is a shortage of  conversations centered around a resolution.  Who is to blame? the employer? the job seeker?  This question demonstrates today’s struggle employers and job seekers are experiencing when engaged in the masterful shell game; hiring and getting hired. 

What can be done?  Businesses and organizations need to effectively employ legacy or institutional  knowledge transfer of more seasoned workers onto new and emerging talent within their organizations, construction and other skilled trades need to amp up apprenticeships to leverage the ability for knowledge transfer before it is too late, and educational institutions need to begin forging new concepts for career planning by offering coursework and learning that supports a brighter future for great possibilities with marketable skills that are in demand, now and in the future.

With an onslaught of retiring workers on the move, it is imperative that businesses create strategies to bolster continued growth into the next decade and that job seekers plan for a career path versus a J.O.B. (Just Over Broke).  

Online Job Search

Looking for a Job.

Individual responsibility is a necessary requirement to defining a career pathway and seeking out resources, in the local community and remotely, that offer training and apprenticeships to prepare for future careers with emphasis in technology, skilled trades and beyond.   

HR executives and hiring managers claim it is the lack of qualified candidates. Job seekers claim it is a lack of good paying jobs and difficulty uncovering viable opportunities. Both are correct and in most cases, the employer and the job seeker, are to blame.

10 Reasons Employers and Job Seekers Stand in Their Own Way:

1. Candidates applying for job opportunities that they are clearly NOT qualified to execute. 

Tip:  Technology is used to process online job applications.  Robots “read” resumes.  If your resume does not feature specific required qualifications you will receive a rejection email in your inbox.

2. Resume’s that do not build value or demonstrate the ability to fulfill the requirements featured in the job posting.

Tip:  Make the investment and hire a qualified career coach or use online resources to ensure your resume is properly read by the software “robots” used to filter resumes in online application tools and that is easily read when sharing or supplying manually through email or other channels.

3. Failing to use a cover letter that connects the resume and work history to the job qualifications and requirements in the job description. 

Tip:  Less than 30% of job postings require a cover letter, however, that doesn’t mean you should not have a cover letter.  What you should know…keep a cover letter to one page, focus on three to four key skills/abilities featured in the job description and match to your qualifications.  Be specific and avoid oversharing personal information, many people have talked themselves OUT of a job by revealing too many personal details.

4. Candidates with “one size fits all” generic degrees or a background with no specific direction or focus. 

Tip:  If you don’t know what you want to do or where you are going on your career pathway; how can an employer understand your value and where you fit?

5. Employers in need of candidates with Science, Technology, Engineering, or Math (STEM) skills or skilled trade background and the selection of qualified individuals is limited.

Tip:  Attract motivated, reliable, and dependable candidates with the possibility of learning new skills or a trade by investing and spending the monies necessary for engaging potential new hires.

6. Candidates not engaging the necessary planning and preparation for job interview success; “just showing up” is NOT enough.

Tip:  Prior Planning Prevents Poor Performance.  Behavioral interviews are most common and understanding how to respond to job interview questions using the proper formula, with practice, will help hiring managers understand your ability to do the job.

7. Employers looking for “Superman” when “Robin” will do.

Tip:  Is there potential?  Potential is a key factor when evaluating talent.  Does the candidate have the POTENTIAL with existing abilities to be “upskilled” into a role versus waiting for the perfect hire?

8. Candidates failing to execute a resume that is adaptive for upload and filtering by Applicant Tracking Software (ATS) and the lack of keywords sprinkled throughout the document in order to “get found” to “get hired”.

Tip:  Follow directions.  If a job description REQUIRES a Bachelor’s degree, your resume must meet the qualification.  If a job description PREFERS a Bachelor’s degree and you have an Associate’s degree, you can apply for that job.  REQUIRES vs. PREFERS.

9. Employers failing to be specific and clear as to required and preferred skills in the job description.

10. Employers poorly trained on appropriate interview techniques and strategies to uncover qualified candidates for hire.

These are just a few examples that stand in the way of good employers finding good employees that are eager to be of value and purpose in your organization.  Good luck!

 

 

 

 

Job Interview Strategy: Ask Questions.

question-mark-in-a-circle_318-27276-png

The job interview process is a two-way street; dialogue is the key to a successful encounter.

Remember the Five “P’s”, Prior Preparation Prevents Poor Performance.

Questions for consideration include:

1. What happened to the previous employee or why is the position available?
This will allow you to determine if the employee was promoted (This is a good sign and may indicate future opportunity if the company promotes from within.) or did they move on (This will indicate that you may have to dig deeper in your questioning to determine management style and corporate culture to determine “fit”.) or is the job a newly created role and the question can reveal the amount of turnover in the position. Beware:  If the position has had five people in that role in the last four years this may be a “red flag”, especially if they are no longer with the company, it could signal management or leadership concerns, etc.

2. What type of on-boarding or initial training is provided to ensure success?  Does (insert name of organization) support continuing education or certifications?  
This question allows the company to express the fundamentals they have in place to ensure your success through a detailed on-boarding and trainee program, continuing education, and resources or certifications for continued professional growth and development.  Ongoing training programs are proven to increase employee engagement.

3. What is the preferred management style of the (insert department, company, etc.)?
This will determine if the role is that of a “worker bee” with minimal contribution or does the culture support input allowing you to contribute concepts and ideas for growth and development of your role and the organization.

4. Would you paint a picture of the typical day in the role of a (insert job title)?
This will allow the organization to provide a snapshot of the role and what you can expect. Look for defined, confident replies.  Some companies allow for job shadowing to determine if a role is a good fit for you and the company. 

5. What challenges/problems/concerns are associated with (insert the department, the role, the company)?
This will reveal the pain they need to address and may open the opportunity for you to share background, skills, or abilities that may assist in overcoming the various challenges revealed and/or mentioned in the job posting.  How can you be of immediate benefit to help the team and the company achieve their defined goals and objectives?

6. How are expectations measured?
This will allow you to get a sense of how your progress and success or failure will be reviewed.  Does the company provide 90-day feedback and review? 6-months? or Annually?  The employee review allows for periodic feedback to assess your contributions and keep you on track for success in your role.

7. What are next steps in the hiring process?
This question should be asked at the end of your job interview. You will gain insight as to the hiring manager’s processes for moving forward and you will be able to navigate your next steps for outreach and expectations.  Should you follow-up by phone? email? When will they be making a decision? 

It is “OK” to ask questions. It is necessary and required! You are interviewing the organization and their team just as much as they are interviewing you. Why? Because you need to also determine “fit”, to learn if this organization’s culture and leadership environment “fits” with your work style and career goals so that you can flourish and succeed and contribute in a productive and meaningful capacity.  Good Luck! 

Job Search Tips: Email and Your Job Search.

jobsIt is important to recognize that today’s job search REQUIRES being comfortable with technology. For many individuals, it may have been 10, 15 or 20 years since embarking on a job search; what worked in the past has changed. We all know that the Sunday job classifieds in the local paper have disappeared and most companies and hiring managers use  job boards or social sites when looking for candidates to hire.

Create an email address that is solely utilized for your job search.

This will allow you to filter and track your job search submissions, alerts and research all in one place while avoiding any SPAM or unsolicited communications from clogging your personal email. Many job seekers create a Google or Yahoo email account they can easily access and use for their job search.

Your Email Address.

Be sure to use your name or some portion of your name in the email address you create for your job search. For example: John.Smith@gmail.com or JSmith@yahoo.com, or JSmith123@gmail.com, etc. Avoid emails that do not identify you in a professional manner. For example: Harleyman@gmail.com, Kitten4you@yahoo.com, grandma1@gmail.com, etc. as they may not be taken seriously and are difficult to weed out among the communications with the hiring manager.

Ready to Send Your Resume?

Due to the strong SPAM filters at many companies you may want to consider building your cover letter and resume into the body of the email versus sending an attachment or PDF file. Why? If it is a job you really desire it may get filtered out of their system, companies rarely communicate receipt unless they are interested in your submission, therefore, if it was filtered…you would never know.  By copy and pasting documents into the body of the email, you ensure that it is submitted.

These are just a few tips to consider when taking on the next steps in the job search process! Happy Hunting!

How Rude! Managing Workplace Conflict.

So you think that your co-worker has it in for you; or that a particular colleague specifically wakes up each morning determining how to make your life more difficult? Well, fortunately… they are not that smart. The real issue boils down to communication (or lack of communication) and putting yourself in the shoes of the other person. 

conflict2

75% of most conflict is petty and small. Someone forgot to replace copy paper in the copy machine, or talking too loud on the phone in the next cubicle, interrupting during meetings, gossip, taking the last cup of coffee from the coffee maker and not replenishing, eating a smelly lunch in a common area and the list goes on and on…..

The Issue.  Most people confuse personalities with issues, the conflict is not dealt with early on, and that most people do not stay to the facts when addressing the conflict.

Avoid addressing the personality and stay focused on the issue. “Sally didn’t put more copy paper in the copier, she’s stupid.” The fact is she failed to refill the copier. When personality comes into the framework of conflict it breeds more conflict. It will force the person to get defensive and justify they are “right” or “should” or disregard the actual offense.

FOCUS ON THE ISSUE!

Deal with the situation, immediately. Avoid letting the irritation or conflict build and build until you finally explode! Be sure to take the person aside, privately. Ask for a specific time and location to meet and indicate what you want to address, collect all the FACTS, and be prepared to control the meeting.

The biggest failure in addressing conflict is the ability to stay with the facts versus opinions: 

Step 1: State the facts of the situation. (“insert name of person, I went to use the copier, and I noticed you were the last person to make copies, and the copy paper tray was empty.”)

Step 2: State the impact it had on you and only you, not everyone in the office. Avoid generalities. (“When copy paper is not in the machine it disrupts my productivity and is frustrating.”)

Step 3: Respect their decision. ( “insert name of person, I can appreciate you are busy and may have overlooked using the last of the copy paper.”)

Step 4: Request an action. (“However, in the future would you please double check the supply before leaving the copy machine?”)

The above formula is useful in addressing conflict that is big or small it allows you to stay with the facts and avoids bringing personality issues into the conversation.

It is true, that some conflict may never be resolved but it can be managed. However, it is important to address the situation immediately to ensure the ability to move forward.  Avoid falling into the “passive aggressive”, trap.

The pitfalls of not dealing with conflict is costly! Lack of trust, lack of respect, impact on productivity, not feeling valued are just a few of the affects of poorly managed conflict in the workplace.  You can gain greater control and the ability to express yourself, honestly and respectfully, will lessen stress and anxiety when dealing with coworkers.  Good luck!

Job Search Tips: Business Cards.

Business Cards and YOUR Job Search.

Create business cards to utilize in your job search and beyond.  A business card is a great tool that will have you standing above your competition. Raise your job search to the next level, avoid writing contact information on a scrap piece of paper or random cocktail napkin, be the professional you claim to be by generating a business card with key detail such as; name, phone number, email, and  job title or industry (optional:  Add job title only if you determine to remain in same industry or job role, otherwise avoid this step).  Avoid including mailing address if your are concerned about safety and security (optional:  Only include city, state, zip)

You can us business cards at job fairs, interviews and at networking events.  Don’t get caught using your old or existing company business card in your job search as it is unprofessional and inappropriate.

Over 80% of those looking for a new career opportunity will find it through someone they know, therefore, a business card will assist your efforts to be remembered.

Sites are easy to use and cards ship within days!  No need to pay for expedited shipping as they deliver quickly, and many offer free or discounted pricing on your first order, provided you do not mind their website address on back of card, or for a nominal charge purchase without advertising.  Either way, they provide card stock with integrity, many easy-to-use templates for design, and additional matching merchandise (sticky notes, note pads, magnets, pens, etc.) to support your search.