Job Search 101. Online a Waste of Time?

Is a job search focused online a waste of time?  You decide.

Do you realize that 68% of available jobs are NEVER posted online? (Source: Statistic Brain, Online Employment Job Posting Website Statistics)

Take greater control of your job search.  It’s what you do with your time that will fast track you to that next possibility. 

man searching online for job

The Job Search Online Struggle.

Did you know the average response rate for online job boards is 4%?  Are you willing to chance your success finding and landing a new job through the maze of online job boards? 

What does this mean?  You will need to seek out opportunity and avoid waiting for that perfect job to surface online or hoping that the “hiring fairy” will come knocking on your front door.

How do you begin a successful job search?

  • Research companies of interest, visit their corporate sites and direct career portals, determine how to outreach after you acquire the mailing address and key contacts (i.e. Director of Human Resources, Hiring Manager, Department Manager) as a result of your research. 
  • Investigate startups, new companies coming into your area or those that are expanding and register to attend hiring events or meetups. 
  • Invest in building your online personal brand and connect with former colleagues by creating a profile on professional social sites like LinkedIn, it’s FREE (over 500 million people can’t be wrong…). 
  • Target specific people, industries, companies, and events for greater success uncovering opportunity by building your net-worth (i.e. net-work).

Tip:  Get connected!  Referral to an internal champion at a company or job role of interest will leverage your impact and increase your chances for getting hired.  Who do you know?

Good companies are always looking for good people!  Get found and get hired by making yourself known to others, volunteer, or simply show up to that next networking meetup in your area.  Get out of the house!

Your next contact may lead you to that key decision-maker when one of the following may occur…

A current employee:

  • Retires
  • Relocates
  • Exits workforce for personal reasons, i.e. pregnancy, sick parent, goes back to school, career change, health concerns, disability
  • Starts their own business
  • Quits
  • Recruited
  • Transfers to another Department
  • Released from Company

Tell everyone and anyone you are looking for a job.  You never know who may know whom and that could translate into a potential lead.

“Someone knows someone, who knows someone, looking for someone…just like you.”-Denise Anne Taylor, Career Coach.

Looking for a job is a full-time job.  Why?  Hours can be spent managing your job search; research, job interviews, networking events, meetups, submission of online applications, more research.  So don’t make the mistake of jumping in and heading for the “help wanted” sign…seek out specific opportunities, ask for help and control your search through people you know.  See more online statistics from Statistic Brain

Good luck!

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Etiquette 101: Getting Hired Over Lunch.

An instant career killer that may cost you a paycheck?  Inappropriate behaviors that may be deal-breakers during a job interview over lunch.

In a highly competitive job market many job seekers are invited to an interview lunch; the interview is actually conducted over a meal. This tactic separates equally matched candidates from the competition and may come at a high price; getting hired.

Dining Image

Silver Platter Hiring.

Useful tips to kick-start a successful job interview over lunch:

Show up on time and at the correct location. Be sure to map out your route if going to an unfamiliar location. BE ON TIME. Heads up! Some hiring managers select a difficult location and have used this tactic to challenge and determine the ability of a job seeker to navigate effectively.

Tip:  When possible, drive by the restaurant the night before and scope out the area; avoid getting “lost” and have a plan for parking, projected mishaps or construction delays.

Unable to resist that piece of gum? Gum chewing becomes an issue when you do not know what to do with that sticky glob once seated at the table before serious discussion. Additionally, the hiring manager or recruiter may face Chiclephobia (The fear of chewing gum.), just ask Oprah Winfrey, no one was allowed to chew gum in her studio when she was a talk show host.

Tip: Opt for mints.

Waving, pointing, or flailing the silver? When engaged in conversation do not wield the knife and fork around as you are speaking. This creates a distraction and is seen as unprofessional.

Tip:  Never, never, never, lick the last bits of mashed potato or other delight from the blade of the knife, at the table, during the job interview (or any other time, for that matter…).

Do you salt or pepper your meal before taking a bite? Think again. This action has been known to send a non-verbal message of making hasty or rash decisions and could cost you that job. Why? You “assumed” the meal needed salt or pepper prior to tasting.

Tip:  Always sample a small bite before adding salt or pepper. In addition, use caution when dousing ketchup, dipping sauces or other condiments to a meal, it may send off a “red flag” and can be seen as an insult to the chef.

Remember, you were not invited to the meal because you are hungry!   Avoid ordering expensive menu items, finger foods and difficult to manage items (ribs, lobster, fried chicken, spaghetti, etc.). Also, if a food item is difficult to eat, you spend more effort on eating the meal and less on building rapport with emphasis on the main mission; GETTING HIRED.

Tip: A salad may be cumbersome, not all leafy greens are cut into bite size pieces; opt for the soup instead.

Avoid alcohol. Alcohol inhibits the ability to recall important details, impairs the ability to remember names (especially in a networking setting), may cause improper conversations to emerge, and is not advisable when being considered for a job.

Tip:  Sparking water and a lime make a good substitute.

The purpose of the interview lunch? To determine your social savvy.  Many times this form of interview is one of THE determining factors in hiring.

Tip:  You are an extension of the company brand when hired; demonstrating good manners set you apart from the competition. It is NOT about the food; it is about the relationship building process and “how to be” may determine “cultural fit” depending on the industry and/or position you are seeking.

These are just a few dining etiquette fundamentals and if traveling abroad be sure to research each culture and the differences when conducting business or a job interview over a lunch or a meal.  Good luck!