Job Search 101. Online a Waste of Time?

Is a job search focused online a waste of time?  You decide.

Do you realize that 68% of available jobs are NEVER posted online? (Source: Statistic Brain, Online Employment Job Posting Website Statistics)

Take greater control of your job search.  It’s what you do with your time that will fast track you to that next possibility. 

man searching online for job

The Job Search Online Struggle.

Did you know the average response rate for online job boards is 4%?  Are you willing to chance your success finding and landing a new job through the maze of online job boards? 

What does this mean?  You will need to seek out opportunity and avoid waiting for that perfect job to surface online or hoping that the “hiring fairy” will come knocking on your front door.

How do you begin a successful job search?

  • Research companies of interest, visit their corporate sites and direct career portals, determine how to outreach after you acquire the mailing address and key contacts (i.e. Director of Human Resources, Hiring Manager, Department Manager) as a result of your research. 
  • Investigate startups, new companies coming into your area or those that are expanding and register to attend hiring events or meetups. 
  • Invest in building your online personal brand and connect with former colleagues by creating a profile on professional social sites like LinkedIn, it’s FREE (over 500 million people can’t be wrong…). 
  • Target specific people, industries, companies, and events for greater success uncovering opportunity by building your net-worth (i.e. net-work).

Tip:  Get connected!  Referral to an internal champion at a company or job role of interest will leverage your impact and increase your chances for getting hired.  Who do you know?

Good companies are always looking for good people!  Get found and get hired by making yourself known to others, volunteer, or simply show up to that next networking meetup in your area.  Get out of the house!

Your next contact may lead you to that key decision-maker when one of the following may occur…

A current employee:

  • Retires
  • Relocates
  • Exits workforce for personal reasons, i.e. pregnancy, sick parent, goes back to school, career change, health concerns, disability
  • Starts their own business
  • Quits
  • Recruited
  • Transfers to another Department
  • Released from Company

Tell everyone and anyone you are looking for a job.  You never know who may know whom and that could translate into a potential lead.

“Someone knows someone, who knows someone, looking for someone…just like you.”-Denise Anne Taylor, Career Coach.

Looking for a job is a full-time job.  Why?  Hours can be spent managing your job search; research, job interviews, networking events, meetups, submission of online applications, more research.  So don’t make the mistake of jumping in and heading for the “help wanted” sign…seek out specific opportunities, ask for help and control your search through people you know.  See more online statistics from Statistic Brain

Good luck!

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Job Search Tips: Email and Your Job Search.

jobsIt is important to recognize that today’s job search REQUIRES being comfortable with technology. For many individuals, it may have been 10, 15 or 20 years since embarking on a job search; what worked in the past has changed. We all know that the Sunday job classifieds in the local paper have disappeared and most companies and hiring managers use  job boards or social sites when looking for candidates to hire.

Create an email address that is solely utilized for your job search.

This will allow you to filter and track your job search submissions, alerts and research all in one place while avoiding any SPAM or unsolicited communications from clogging your personal email. Many job seekers create a Google or Yahoo email account they can easily access and use for their job search.

Your Email Address.

Be sure to use your name or some portion of your name in the email address you create for your job search. For example: John.Smith@gmail.com or JSmith@yahoo.com, or JSmith123@gmail.com, etc. Avoid emails that do not identify you in a professional manner. For example: Harleyman@gmail.com, Kitten4you@yahoo.com, grandma1@gmail.com, etc. as they may not be taken seriously and are difficult to weed out among the communications with the hiring manager.

Ready to Send Your Resume?

Due to the strong SPAM filters at many companies you may want to consider building your cover letter and resume into the body of the email versus sending an attachment or PDF file. Why? If it is a job you really desire it may get filtered out of their system, companies rarely communicate receipt unless they are interested in your submission, therefore, if it was filtered…you would never know.  By copy and pasting documents into the body of the email, you ensure that it is submitted.

These are just a few tips to consider when taking on the next steps in the job search process! Happy Hunting!

Career Transition Success-Agility.

Personal agility in a time of adversity is the key to unlocking the paralyzing affect of change.

Agility (u-jil-i-tee): The power of moving quickly and easily; nimbleness.

Health.Cycle.Pic.The loss of a job can create an identity crisis; especially when demand for an occupation is limited or non-existent.

This is a time to re-evaluate, re-invent, and re-direct.

Is re-education an option?  Learning new skills is an excellent way to increase marketability, reinvigorate career direction, network and expand the circle of influence.

Are existing skills and abilities transferable to other industries?  Hard skills/technical skills developed in previous work history may transfer regardless of industry.  Use a cover letter to distinguish a change in industry and highlight the transferable hard skills.

Is a startup or entrepreneurship on the horizon?  Translate a hobby or interest into a viable business opportunity.  Visit a local college or Small Business Administration (SBA) location to get details on programs to assist with business planning and development.

The key to success is in agility; what is your agility factor?

Remember, if nothing changes; nothing changes.  Onward ever; backward never!

Job Search Tips: Research!

Research, research, and more research. It is important to come prepared to the interview. Investigate a company thoroughly; understand their philosophies, financial status, size and locations, recent press releases reveal wonderful detail, products and services.

As with any presentation; you must know your audience and interviewing is no different.

This step is not only to impress the interviewer with your interview savvy and company knowledge. It is also an important step to determine if the organization if a good “fit” for you, as well.

Too many candidates for hire choose to “wing-it” or “go with the flow” when it comes to interviewing, and in this competitive marketplace that attitude no longer prevails.

Candidates owe it to themselves to research an organization.  The ability to access information and detail from around the globe means there are no excuses for not being prepared.

Researching a company shows your interest, allows you to ask specific questions, and ensures your selection when determining which company to represent.  Be an investigative reporter and learn everything and anything you can about the company, the role, and the hiring manager before the interview and you will be on your way to success.

Know your Value.

I’m reminded of a famous story about Picasso: He was sitting in a park, drawing sketches. A woman recognized him and asked if he would draw her portrait. He agreed and spent a few minutes sketching. He handed over the picture and said something to the effect of, “Here you go, that will be $5,000.” “$5,000!” the woman exclaimed. “It only took you five minutes to draw that picture.” “No, madam,” he replied. “It took me my entire life!” — Picasso knew the value of developing talent, and he died rich, entertaining friends.

Toot your own horn! Avoid underestimating your true value…